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In the spirit of the third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), the Humanitarian Practice Network will be hosting a side event in Sendai to introduce the upcoming revised edition of Good Practice Review (GPR) 9 on Disaster risk reduction: mitigation and preparedness in development and emergency programming.

In the spirit of the third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), the Humanitarian Practice Network will be hosting a side event in Sendai to introduce the upcoming revised edition of Good Practice Review (GPR) 9 on Disaster risk reduction: mitigation and preparedness in development and emergency programming.

In the spirit of the third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), the Humanitarian Practice Network will be hosting a side event in Sendai to introduce the upcoming revised edition of Good Practice Review (GPR) 9 on Disaster risk reduction: mitigation and preparedness in development and emergency programming.

In the spirit of the third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), the Humanitarian Practice Network will be hosting a side event in Sendai to introduce the upcoming revised edition of Good Practice Review (GPR) 9 on Disaster risk reduction: mitigation and preparedness in development and emergency programming.

In the spirit of the third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), the Humanitarian Practice Network will be hosting a side event in Sendai to introduce the upcoming revised edition of Good Practice Review (GPR) 9 on Disaster risk reduction: mitigation and preparedness in development and emergency programming.

This WCDRR event aims to change the debate on how to incentivize greater investment in DRR through analysis of the wider co-benefits of DRR investments that occur independently of whether or not the disaster event occurs. A lively panel session will draw on study findings by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), World Bank GFDRR and others.

This WCDRR event aims to change the debate on how to incentivize greater investment in DRR through analysis of the wider co-benefits of DRR investments that occur independently of whether or not the disaster event occurs. A lively panel session will draw on study findings by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), World Bank GFDRR and others.

This WCDRR event aims to change the debate on how to incentivize greater investment in DRR through analysis of the wider co-benefits of DRR investments that occur independently of whether or not the disaster event occurs. A lively panel session will draw on study findings by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), World Bank GFDRR and others.

This WCDRR event aims to change the debate on how to incentivize greater investment in DRR through analysis of the wider co-benefits of DRR investments that occur independently of whether or not the disaster event occurs. A lively panel session will draw on study findings by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), World Bank GFDRR and others.

This WCDRR event aims to change the debate on how to incentivize greater investment in DRR through analysis of the wider co-benefits of DRR investments that occur independently of whether or not the disaster event occurs. A lively panel session will draw on study findings by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI), World Bank GFDRR and others.

​2015 will be a critical year for international development finance. The Sustainable Development Goals will shape the global priorities for economic, environmental and social development  to 2030, while the  Financing for Development (FfD) Conference in Addis Ababa in July will agree how the world can finance these global ambitions.

International public finance will play a crucial role in putting priorities into practice. But given its changing nature, and the proliferation of new sources and mechanisms of development finance, how can it meet the challenges of our new era?

To set the stage for these debates, ODI and a global coalition of partners, including UNDP, CEPEI, ACET, CABRI, ESRF, DFI, DI and the Brookings Institution, are hosting ‘Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development’. The conference, taking place from 17-18 March in Accra, Ghana, will explore how international public finance can best contribute to accelerating progress in development from 2015 - identifying specific contributions to the Financing for Development process and influencing key decision-makers ahead of the July summit.

Convening high-level speakers from around the world in Ghana, an emerging African economy responding to a fast evolving development finance landscape, will also allow for a discussion on the continued challenges middle–income countries face in the new era.

Register your interest in this event now.

For more information, visit the Development Progress website.

​2015 will be a critical year for international development finance. The Sustainable Development Goals will shape the global priorities for economic, environmental and social development  to 2030, while the  Financing for Development (FfD) Conference in Addis Ababa in July will agree how the world can finance these global ambitions.

International public finance will play a crucial role in putting priorities into practice. But given its changing nature, and the proliferation of new sources and mechanisms of development finance, how can it meet the challenges of our new era?

To set the stage for these debates, ODI and a global coalition of partners, including UNDP, CEPEI, ACET, CABRI, ESRF, DFI, DI and the Brookings Institution, are hosting ‘Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development’. The conference, taking place from 17-18 March in Accra, Ghana, will explore how international public finance can best contribute to accelerating progress in development from 2015 - identifying specific contributions to the Financing for Development process and influencing key decision-makers ahead of the July summit.

Convening high-level speakers from around the world in Ghana, an emerging African economy responding to a fast evolving development finance landscape, will also allow for a discussion on the continued challenges middle–income countries face in the new era.

Register your interest in this event now.

For more information, visit the Development Progress website.

​2015 will be a critical year for international development finance. The Sustainable Development Goals will shape the global priorities for economic, environmental and social development  to 2030, while the  Financing for Development (FfD) Conference in Addis Ababa in July will agree how the world can finance these global ambitions.

International public finance will play a crucial role in putting priorities into practice. But given its changing nature, and the proliferation of new sources and mechanisms of development finance, how can it meet the challenges of our new era?

To set the stage for these debates, ODI and a global coalition of partners, including UNDP, CEPEI, ACET, CABRI, ESRF, DFI, DI and the Brookings Institution, are hosting ‘Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development’. The conference, taking place from 17-18 March in Accra, Ghana, will explore how international public finance can best contribute to accelerating progress in development from 2015 - identifying specific contributions to the Financing for Development process and influencing key decision-makers ahead of the July summit.

Convening high-level speakers from around the world in Ghana, an emerging African economy responding to a fast evolving development finance landscape, will also allow for a discussion on the continued challenges middle–income countries face in the new era.

Register your interest in this event now.

For more information, visit the Development Progress website.

​2015 will be a critical year for international development finance. The Sustainable Development Goals will shape the global priorities for economic, environmental and social development  to 2030, while the  Financing for Development (FfD) Conference in Addis Ababa in July will agree how the world can finance these global ambitions.

International public finance will play a crucial role in putting priorities into practice. But given its changing nature, and the proliferation of new sources and mechanisms of development finance, how can it meet the challenges of our new era?

To set the stage for these debates, ODI and a global coalition of partners, including UNDP, CEPEI, ACET, CABRI, ESRF, DFI, DI and the Brookings Institution, are hosting ‘Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development’. The conference, taking place from 17-18 March in Accra, Ghana, will explore how international public finance can best contribute to accelerating progress in development from 2015 - identifying specific contributions to the Financing for Development process and influencing key decision-makers ahead of the July summit.

Convening high-level speakers from around the world in Ghana, an emerging African economy responding to a fast evolving development finance landscape, will also allow for a discussion on the continued challenges middle–income countries face in the new era.

Register your interest in this event now.

For more information, visit the Development Progress website.

​2015 will be a critical year for international development finance. The Sustainable Development Goals will shape the global priorities for economic, environmental and social development  to 2030, while the  Financing for Development (FfD) Conference in Addis Ababa in July will agree how the world can finance these global ambitions.

International public finance will play a crucial role in putting priorities into practice. But given its changing nature, and the proliferation of new sources and mechanisms of development finance, how can it meet the challenges of our new era?

To set the stage for these debates, ODI and a global coalition of partners, including UNDP, CEPEI, ACET, CABRI, ESRF, DFI, DI and the Brookings Institution, are hosting ‘Financing the Future: Fresh Perspectives on Global Development’. The conference, taking place from 17-18 March in Accra, Ghana, will explore how international public finance can best contribute to accelerating progress in development from 2015 - identifying specific contributions to the Financing for Development process and influencing key decision-makers ahead of the July summit.

Convening high-level speakers from around the world in Ghana, an emerging African economy responding to a fast evolving development finance landscape, will also allow for a discussion on the continued challenges middle–income countries face in the new era.

Register your interest in this event now.

For more information, visit the Development Progress website.

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