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​The Overseas Development Institute invites you to join an evening of lively discussion on shifting narratives and images of development progress.

With unprecedented access to technology, those at the grassroots can now tell their own stories direct to a world stage. How does this challenge perceptions of development? And what does this mean for the traditional story-tellers – journalists, photographers, film-makers and charities?

The evening will feature a keynote speaker and expert panel debate, with plenty of opportunity for guests to meet people from different disciplines, explore the exhibition, and enjoy complimentary drinks and nibbles inspired by the six countries that feature in the project.

All welcome. Admission free.

​The Overseas Development Institute invites you to join an evening of lively discussion on shifting narratives and images of development progress.

With unprecedented access to technology, those at the grassroots can now tell their own stories direct to a world stage. How does this challenge perceptions of development? And what does this mean for the traditional story-tellers – journalists, photographers, film-makers and charities?

The evening will feature a keynote speaker and expert panel debate, with plenty of opportunity for guests to meet people from different disciplines, explore the exhibition, and enjoy complimentary drinks and nibbles inspired by the six countries that feature in the project.

All welcome. Admission free.

​The Overseas Development Institute invites you to join an evening of lively discussion on shifting narratives and images of development progress.

With unprecedented access to technology, those at the grassroots can now tell their own stories direct to a world stage. How does this challenge perceptions of development? And what does this mean for the traditional story-tellers – journalists, photographers, film-makers and charities?

The evening will feature a keynote speaker and expert panel debate, with plenty of opportunity for guests to meet people from different disciplines, explore the exhibition, and enjoy complimentary drinks and nibbles inspired by the six countries that feature in the project.

All welcome. Admission free.

​The Overseas Development Institute invites you to join an evening of lively discussion on shifting narratives and images of development progress.

With unprecedented access to technology, those at the grassroots can now tell their own stories direct to a world stage. How does this challenge perceptions of development? And what does this mean for the traditional story-tellers – journalists, photographers, film-makers and charities?

The evening will feature a keynote speaker and expert panel debate, with plenty of opportunity for guests to meet people from different disciplines, explore the exhibition, and enjoy complimentary drinks and nibbles inspired by the six countries that feature in the project.

All welcome. Admission free.

​The Overseas Development Institute invites you to join an evening of lively discussion on shifting narratives and images of development progress.

With unprecedented access to technology, those at the grassroots can now tell their own stories direct to a world stage. How does this challenge perceptions of development? And what does this mean for the traditional story-tellers – journalists, photographers, film-makers and charities?

The evening will feature a keynote speaker and expert panel debate, with plenty of opportunity for guests to meet people from different disciplines, explore the exhibition, and enjoy complimentary drinks and nibbles inspired by the six countries that feature in the project.

All welcome. Admission free.

​Greater progress is being made today than at any other time in history, with poverty rates plummeting and striking advances across all areas of human development.

Meet those experiencing these changes first-hand.

This exhibition hosted at the Royal Geographical Society and in partnership with PhotoVoice showcases photographs and narratives by community memebers in China, Ethiopia, Ghana, Nepal, Peru and Tunisia who were supported by PhotoVoice to share their views on what's working and why.

Areas explored by local community members include education, maternal health, political voice, urban poverty, women’s empowerment, water management and renewable energy.

All welcome. Admission free.

​Greater progress is being made today than at any other time in history, with poverty rates plummeting and striking advances across all areas of human development.

Meet those experiencing these changes first-hand.

This exhibition hosted at the Royal Geographical Society and in partnership with PhotoVoice showcases photographs and narratives by community memebers in China, Ethiopia, Ghana, Nepal, Peru and Tunisia who were supported by PhotoVoice to share their views on what's working and why.

Areas explored by local community members include education, maternal health, political voice, urban poverty, women’s empowerment, water management and renewable energy.

All welcome. Admission free.

​Greater progress is being made today than at any other time in history, with poverty rates plummeting and striking advances across all areas of human development.

Meet those experiencing these changes first-hand.

This exhibition hosted at the Royal Geographical Society and in partnership with PhotoVoice showcases photographs and narratives by community memebers in China, Ethiopia, Ghana, Nepal, Peru and Tunisia who were supported by PhotoVoice to share their views on what's working and why.

Areas explored by local community members include education, maternal health, political voice, urban poverty, women’s empowerment, water management and renewable energy.

All welcome. Admission free.

​Greater progress is being made today than at any other time in history, with poverty rates plummeting and striking advances across all areas of human development.

Meet those experiencing these changes first-hand.

This exhibition hosted at the Royal Geographical Society and in partnership with PhotoVoice showcases photographs and narratives by community memebers in China, Ethiopia, Ghana, Nepal, Peru and Tunisia who were supported by PhotoVoice to share their views on what's working and why.

Areas explored by local community members include education, maternal health, political voice, urban poverty, women’s empowerment, water management and renewable energy.

All welcome. Admission free.

​Greater progress is being made today than at any other time in history, with poverty rates plummeting and striking advances across all areas of human development.

Meet those experiencing these changes first-hand.

This exhibition hosted at the Royal Geographical Society and in partnership with PhotoVoice showcases photographs and narratives by community memebers in China, Ethiopia, Ghana, Nepal, Peru and Tunisia who were supported by PhotoVoice to share their views on what's working and why.

Areas explored by local community members include education, maternal health, political voice, urban poverty, women’s empowerment, water management and renewable energy.

All welcome. Admission free.

Digital
data are increasingly changing the shape of our world. At the same time,
attention is also being paid to the woeful state of development data – we know
the least about those who are most lacking, and people often lack the
information and capacities they need to bring about change. Unsurprisingly this
has led to a focus on how we can harness the potential of the new and rapidly
evolving digital landscape to meet some of these acute data gaps, and more profoundly,
to improve policymaking and citizen empowerment. But while some insist that Big
Data may provide an opportunity to ‘leapfrog’ statistical systems in developing
countries, others argue that Big Data is largely Big Hype, and that traditional
statistical concerns and methods limit its applications for official
statistics. And new concerns altogether are emerging including around privacy
and ownership of personal data.

Digital
data are increasingly changing the shape of our world. At the same time,
attention is also being paid to the woeful state of development data – we know
the least about those who are most lacking, and people often lack the
information and capacities they need to bring about change. Unsurprisingly this
has led to a focus on how we can harness the potential of the new and rapidly
evolving digital landscape to meet some of these acute data gaps, and more profoundly,
to improve policymaking and citizen empowerment. But while some insist that Big
Data may provide an opportunity to ‘leapfrog’ statistical systems in developing
countries, others argue that Big Data is largely Big Hype, and that traditional
statistical concerns and methods limit its applications for official
statistics. And new concerns altogether are emerging including around privacy
and ownership of personal data.

Digital
data are increasingly changing the shape of our world. At the same time,
attention is also being paid to the woeful state of development data – we know
the least about those who are most lacking, and people often lack the
information and capacities they need to bring about change. Unsurprisingly this
has led to a focus on how we can harness the potential of the new and rapidly
evolving digital landscape to meet some of these acute data gaps, and more profoundly,
to improve policymaking and citizen empowerment. But while some insist that Big
Data may provide an opportunity to ‘leapfrog’ statistical systems in developing
countries, others argue that Big Data is largely Big Hype, and that traditional
statistical concerns and methods limit its applications for official
statistics. And new concerns altogether are emerging including around privacy
and ownership of personal data.

Digital
data are increasingly changing the shape of our world. At the same time,
attention is also being paid to the woeful state of development data – we know
the least about those who are most lacking, and people often lack the
information and capacities they need to bring about change. Unsurprisingly this
has led to a focus on how we can harness the potential of the new and rapidly
evolving digital landscape to meet some of these acute data gaps, and more profoundly,
to improve policymaking and citizen empowerment. But while some insist that Big
Data may provide an opportunity to ‘leapfrog’ statistical systems in developing
countries, others argue that Big Data is largely Big Hype, and that traditional
statistical concerns and methods limit its applications for official
statistics. And new concerns altogether are emerging including around privacy
and ownership of personal data.

Digital
data are increasingly changing the shape of our world. At the same time,
attention is also being paid to the woeful state of development data – we know
the least about those who are most lacking, and people often lack the
information and capacities they need to bring about change. Unsurprisingly this
has led to a focus on how we can harness the potential of the new and rapidly
evolving digital landscape to meet some of these acute data gaps, and more profoundly,
to improve policymaking and citizen empowerment. But while some insist that Big
Data may provide an opportunity to ‘leapfrog’ statistical systems in developing
countries, others argue that Big Data is largely Big Hype, and that traditional
statistical concerns and methods limit its applications for official
statistics. And new concerns altogether are emerging including around privacy
and ownership of personal data.

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